GoHealth Urgent Care News

Do energy drinks really work? Here's what goes on in your body when you guzzle.

Souce: Mic

By Melissa Kravitz

November 30, 2016

 

If only there was a quick solution to reviving your mind and body after a long night of partying, reading or whatever you've lost sleep on. 

Oh wait — there is! Well, at least there's a product that wants to ...

Do energy drinks really work? Here's what goes on in your body when you guzzle.

Souce: Mic

By Melissa Kravitz

November 30, 2016

 

If only there was a quick solution to reviving your mind and body after a long night of partying, reading or whatever you've lost sleep on. 

Oh wait — there is! Well, at least there's a product that wants to convince us it's capable of doing so. There's a lot of different energy drinks out there — though most of them similarly taste like the liquid seeping out of a week-old garbage bag. These horrendously flavored, caffeine-loaded products may promise instant energy, but are they all they're cracked up to be?  

While "energy drink" is a broad category, and many of them are made up of their own unique combinations of ingredients for differing taste and effectiveness, the general formula is pretty much the same across most brands. "The vast majority [of energy drinks] use caffeine as the base," Dr. Robert Korn of GoHealth Urgent Care said in an email. "Caffeine, when taken in moderate amounts, such as several cups of coffee in a day, is a proven stimulant and alertness drug."

A legal alertness drug? Perfection. Well, not quite. "In excessive doses, caffeine in any form can cause jitteriness, palpitations and sometimes more serious symptoms," Korn explained. While a standard 12-oz cappuccino has about 154 mg of caffeine, Rockstar iced energy drink has 250 mg in a 16-oz serving and Red Bull has about 80 mg per 8-oz serving. 

Though the caffeine content in energy drinks may rival your favorite coffeecreation, know that whatever's in that can is not straight caffeine. "Most of the non-caffeine additives in energy drinks are of dubious value," Korn said. "Most are vitamins, which often cannot be absorbed in excess amounts, or other substances, like amino acids or plant-derived chemicals of unproven benefits." 

If that's not enough to make you slow down your energy-drink-chugging routine, Korn also noted that "in some cases, these additives may be dangerous [especially] if one were to drink multiple energy drinks at once." One study found that niacin, an ingredient in energy drinks, may cause hepatitis. 

 

Instead, Korn advises "a good cup of Joe." If a morning coffee isn't enough to keep you awake all day — and your workplace doesn't allow afternoon naps — Korn noted that it's also totally fine to have "a second or third during the day to stay on top of your game."

In short, Dr. Korn has some financial advice: Skip the energy drink and go for the coffee, because everything else is money you could be spending on your next great idea. In-office nap pods, perhaps? 

Selena Gomez Swears By Using A 'Sweat Bed' To Feel Healthier

Source: Self

By Korin Miller

November 28, 2016

 

Here, experts discuss the practice.

Selena Gomez revealed in a new interview that she’s not great at pushing herself during exercise. "I'...

Selena Gomez Swears By Using A 'Sweat Bed' To Feel Healthier

Source: Self

By Korin Miller

November 28, 2016

 

Here, experts discuss the practice.

Selena Gomez revealed in a new interview that she’s not great at pushing herself during exercise. "I'm horrible at discipline when it comes to working out,” she tells Elle. “I'm one of those people who's like, 'Ah, I ran for five minutes. I think I'm good.’”

While the 24-year-old says she works out with a trainer, hikes, and does Pilates, she also says simply sweating makes her feel good. "I have a sweat bed, which looks like a burrito that I wrap myself up in, and I sweat for about 45 minutes," she says. "Just little things to kind of keep me healthy and keep me focused."

For people who aren’t familiar with the concept, Gomez explains how it works: “You lie in these beds in a sweatsuit, and they wrap you up and you sweat for 45 minutes, and it releases all the toxins of your body...kind of the equivalent of a sauna."

Is this legitimate? First, a primer on toxins. Women’s health expert Jennifer Wider, M.D., tells SELF that "toxins" is one of the most misused words among health fans. “A toxin is technically a poison produced by a plant or animal, for example: snake venom,” she says. “When a diet, cleanse, or exercise regimen touts the benefits of cleansing your body of ‘toxins,’ it probably refers to ‘toxic’ substances we come across in our daily lives—germs and other substances like mercury, BPA, and pollutants,” she says.

The problem, per Wider, is that there's no real science to support the cleansing claims made by popular health trends. Your body actually flushes out toxins on its own, largely through your kidneys, Morton Tavel, M.D., a clinical professor of medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine and author of Snake Oil Is Alive and Well: The Clash Between Myths and Reality—Reflections of a Physician, tells SELF. Your liver also plays a role in the detoxification process, GoHealth Urgent Care's Andy Barnett, M.D., tells SELF. Some substances, like mercury and BPA, can get stored in your body no matter how well your system filters out toxins. “But in trace amounts, these are probably not harmful,” Wider says.

Here's where sweating, which your body mainly does to regulate your temperature, comes into the picture: Your skin is the first line of defense against toxic substances, and it forms a protective barrier that prevents germs from entering your body. “If a person sweats, the salt content makes it a ‘hostile environment’ for most bacteria,” Wider says. “So, in this way, it prevents toxic substances from getting into our bodies in the first place.”

But Marc Leavey, M.D., an internist at Baltimore's Mercy Medical Center, tells SELF that sweating on its own doesn't remove toxins from your body. "Dissolved in your sweat, which is mostly water, is about 1 percent salt, some proteins, and other metabolic byproducts," he says. "There may even be some tiny amounts of hormones. But there is no physiologic mechanism to excrete toxins of concern through your sweat."

Still, Wider says Gomez’s claims that using a sweat bed makes her look and feel better are entirely possible. Sweating can give you a healthy appearance, since the blood vessels located under your skin will dilate, leaving you with a glow, she points out. Plus, it can boost your blood circulation, which is good for your overall health, Barnett says. “Also, sweating can promote weight loss temporarily (from water loss), so your body may feel slightly different for a short period of time,” Wider adds. Of course, that’s just water weight—just sweating won’t actually help you lose fat.

Tavel points out that there can be a big mental component as well: “Perhaps [sweating] makes one feel like they have been exercising, thus falsely believing that the sweating alone is replacing the positive value of a real workout.” Leavey agrees that many of the benefits of sweating may be mental. "Since sweating is often associated with exercise, and exercise makes you feel good and rejuvenated, sweating also carries the same panache to many people," he says.

If you still want to give sweating for sweating's sake a try, no need to seek out a sweat bed—you can just hop in the sauna at your local gym, Sherry Ross, M.D., women's health expert at California's Providence Saint John’s Health Center, tells SELF. However, be aware that you can get dehydratedand overheated when you sweat like this. Ross recommends drinking plenty of water, especially right before you get in and after you get out, and being on the lookout for symptoms like a headache and dizziness. If you experience them, leave the sauna ASAP, and drink plenty of water or a beverage with electrolytes.

While sweating on its own may make you feel good in the short term, Ross says you'll ultimately get more of a boost from going for a run or doing some other aerobic activity. "That's going to have more benefit in the long term" since exercise offers a wealth of physical and mental benefits, she says.

Improving urgent care

Source: West Linn Tidings

By Kelsey O'Halloran

November 18, 2016

 

The bright, high-tech waiting room at West Linn’s newest urgent care facility is just one of many ways that Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care hopes to pr...

Improving urgent care

Source: West Linn Tidings

By Kelsey O'Halloran

November 18, 2016

 

The bright, high-tech waiting room at West Linn’s newest urgent care facility is just one of many ways that Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care hopes to provide the best experience possible for its patients. 

The company recently opened a GoHealth center in West Linn, which offers services for nonlife-threatening illnesses and injuries with no appointment necessary, and can also transport patients to a Legacy hospital for more extensive treatment. 

The exam rooms are fully equipped handle most non-serious medical needs.

Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care Medical Director Andy Barnett says GoHealth provides all the services of a regular urgent care center and more, including a mobile x-ray machine and a convenient check-in system. The West Linn center, the company’s 15th in Oregon, means local residents won’t have to drive more than a few minutes to receive high-quality drop-in care. 

“We all want to make people feel better when they’re sick,” Barnett says. “We feel that this creates the perfect environment to do it, and that’s a great feeling as a medical provider.” 

Here are a few things that set the center apart: 

High-tech experience

When patients enter the urgent care center, they’re directed to check in at a tablet station by the door. As they sit down to wait, a wall-mounted screen will show them their expected treatment time. 

Prospective patients can even check the GoHealth website before coming to the center to compare the wait times at various centers around the Portland metro area and choose the one that suits their needs. 

Innovative design

The facility’s interior is designed to create a comfortable, healing environment with curved architecture, bright colors and ample light. 

“The award-winning design, to me as a provider, has created a really pleasant space to work in and to care for patients in,” Barnett says. 

While the four exam rooms have glass walls to provide an open and modern feel as patients walk in, the “smart glass” can become opaque with the flick of a switch, providing complete privacy during patient care. 

Integrated, affordable care

Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care Medical Director Andy Barnett says he appreciates the new centers innovative design.

Unlike a typical urgent care center, GoHealth is part of an integrated network of care with Legacy Health, meaning that care information can be easily transferred from the center to a specialist at a larger Legacy treatment center. 

If a patient comes into the urgent care center with a broken leg, the center staff can provide basic treatment and bring a mobile X-ray machine right into the exam room to take a closer look. Within the same day, the patient’s Legacy Health primary care doctor could look at the X-ray and provide feedback, because the center shares Legacy Health’s medical records system. 

t’s cheaper than a visit to the emergency room, Barnett says, and a higher level of care for the patient. 

This fall and winter, the center is offering $25 walk-in flu shots seven days a week. Barnett invites local residents to stop in to get a flu shot and check out the new facility. 

GOHEALTH URGENT CARE WEST LINN

21900 Willamette Drive #209, West Linn

971-339-0360

gohealthuc.com/northwest

 

 

An "uber" urgent care experience arrives in Portland

Source: Portland Mom's Blog

By Portland Mom's Blog

November 18, 2016

 

There are a couple of notable brands we see popping up pretty rapidly around the Portland metro in recent months. One is Legacy-GoHealth Urgent ...

An "uber" urgent care experience arrives in Portland

Source: Portland Mom's Blog

By Portland Mom's Blog

November 18, 2016

 

There are a couple of notable brands we see popping up pretty rapidly around the Portland metro in recent months. One is Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care centers (they now have 18 area locations), and the other–showing up in thousands of area car windows–is Uber. At first glance you wouldn’t think one has anything to do with the other, however, as a couple of our bloggers discovered at a recent event at the Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care location at N. Williams, these two companies actually make a pretty great team to support area families. 

During a wellness event earlier this week, Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care launched an innovative healthcare program to Uber driver-partners and their families in Portland and neighboring communities. Why is that significant? For starters, a growing number of moms and dads see “gig jobs” with on-demand workforces like Uber as a way to earn extra income while having much sought after flexibility. But what’s typically missing from these opportunities are benefits like medical insurance. The services now available to Uber drivers and their families at Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care locations include $0 out-of-pocket flu shots, discounted sports clearance exams and free wellness classes. The program also offers diabetes and heart health classes, as well as biometric screenings and ergonomics therapy. 

Here are a just a few things shared at the recent Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care event that we love about their model of “patient-first” care:

  • High-quality, experienced clinical care in state of the art facilities (and all providers are skilled in serving the pediatric community as well as adults). We’ve been fortunate to share their expertise on our site. 
  • Their mobile-enabled web presence enables patients to easily check in online and do any “waiting” before they ever arrive at a center. 
  • A unified electronic medical record, avoiding unnecessary and duplicative testing and imaging, and with direct connections to specialty physicians and other aftercare providers through the Legacy Health system.
  • Industry-leading consumer satisfaction scores.

Easy access to care that leads to better, healthier lives is something we are always excited to see in our community. So ask the next Uber driver you encounter if he or she has stopped into their local Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care Center for their preventive care. And be sure to find YOUR nearest center to take advantage of their top-quality care with unparalleled access, convenience and value.

Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care partners with Uber

Source: The Columbian

By The Columbian

November 15, 2016

Uber drivers in the Portland-Vancouver area now have access to health care services at area Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care centers.

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgen...

Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care partners with Uber

Source: The Columbian

By The Columbian

November 15, 2016

Uber drivers in the Portland-Vancouver area now have access to health care services at area Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care centers.

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care on Tuesday announced the partnership with the ride-sharing company. Through the partnership, Uber drivers and their families can receive flu shots with no out-of-pocket costs, sports physicals and free wellness classes. The program also offers diabetes and heart health classes.

Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care has 18 centers in the Portland area, including centers in Camas, Cascade Park and Hazel Dell.

Legacy GoHealth partners with Uber

Souce: Portland Business Journal

By Elizabeth Hayes

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are partnering with Uber to bring health care services to the thousands of Portland residents who are driv...

Legacy GoHealth partners with Uber

Souce: Portland Business Journal

By Elizabeth Hayes

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are partnering with Uber to bring health care services to the thousands of Portland residents who are drivers for the ridesharing company.

“What we love about Portland is what a sophisticated health care market it is,” said Todd Latz, CEO of GoHealth Urgent Care, based in Atlanta. “One of the areas we identified as we looked at the market is the on-demand economy, gig workers who hadn’t had as much access to services.”

Among the services available to drivers and their families are free flu shots, sports physicals and wellness classes.

Latz said GoHealth streamlined the online check-in system for drivers. Those who buy insurance on their own through the health exchange can use those benefits. Those who are uninsured will enjoy special pricing, Latz said.

Legacy-GoHealth has grown to 18 urgent care centers around Portland.

This is the third health care partnership for Uber, which entered into similar agreements with Dignity Health-GoHealth Urgent Care in San Francisco and Northwell Health-GoHealth Urgent Care in New York.

Legacy Health to provide healthcare for Uber drivers

Source: KPTV 

By Fox 12 Staff

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are teaming up to provide healthcare options for Uber drivers.

The partnership will provide tailored healthcare services...

Legacy Health to provide healthcare for Uber drivers

Source: KPTV 

By Fox 12 Staff

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are teaming up to provide healthcare options for Uber drivers.

The partnership will provide tailored healthcare services to Uber drivers at 18 co-branded centers.

Some of the services include free flu shots, physical wellness classes and medical screening.

The initiative marks a significant change in the way companies like Uber provide access to healthcare.

"I'm doing well by doing good, I guess. I need a flu shot and I'm sure Uber needs me not to be sick when all the nastiness comes on. I'm happy to get one," said Uber driver, Matthew Workman.

The initiative will have an online service cutting down waiting times for patients.

Families of Uber drivers can also take advantage of some services.

Is Raising Awareness For Women's Health, Is Pink Overshadowing Red?

Source: Self

By Elizabeth Millard

October 24, 2016

 

Recognizing heart disease, the leading cause of death in women.

There’s no denying the power of breast cancer awareness efforts—esp...

Is Raising Awareness For Women's Health, Is Pink Overshadowing Red?

Source: Self

By Elizabeth Millard

October 24, 2016

 

Recognizing heart disease, the leading cause of death in women.

There’s no denying the power of breast cancer awareness efforts—especially in October, a month-long campaign that features everything from special jerseys on NFL players to marathon fundraising walks to pink ribbons everywhere.

Creating greater awareness of breast cancer is crucial for persuading more women to have regular screenings, and is credited with contributing to a decrease in death rates from the disease over the last couple decades. But there may be an unintended consequence to the effectiveness of the campaign: The actual leading cause of death in women—heart disease—is getting less play. And that could be dangerous, some experts believe.

It isn't called the silent killer for nothing. “Women are much more likely than men to have ‘atypical’ symptoms of heart disease, which can make it challenging to know when there’s an issue,” Andy Barnett, M.D., medical director of Legacy Health-GoHealth Urgent Care, tells SELF. That's why it's so important for women to be proactive in taking steps to ensure their hearts are healthy, he says. But many don't realize they need to be.

While breast cancer is getting a top spot in health perception nationwide, women are neglecting to realize the dangers of heart disease. Is it possible that pink’s prominence is causing an unintended, negative impact on women’s heart health?

Even when it comes to health issues, marketing is a really powerful tool.

Researchers at the University of Missouri were struck by how recent studies indicated that the U.S. has a disadvantage in women’s life expectancycompared to peer countries, despite high rates of health screenings like mammography and breast cancer awareness.

They decided to look at perception of risk, and asked about 600 women aged 35 to 49 about breast cancer risk versus heart disease risk. The researchers found that minority women and those with lower education levels were significantly more likely to believe that breast cancer causes more deaths among women than heart disease, according to lead researcher Julie Kapp, M.P.H, Ph.D., associate professor at the University of Missouri School of Medicine.

“We were not especially surprised by the findings, given the pink ribbon is one of the most widely recognized symbols in the United States and may lead to the perception that it (breast cancer) causes more deaths,” she says.

It doesn't. The number one cause of death for women in the U.S. is heart disease, followed by all cancers, among which breast cancer ranks as the second-most deadly. About 40,450 women are expected to die from breast cancer in the U.S this year, according to breastcancer.org—that's around 1 in 30. As many as 1 in 3 women die each year from cardiovascular disease or stroke—more than from all cancers combined.

The misperception can be especially prevalent among African American women, Kapp adds. Because they are more likely than Caucasian women to die from breast cancer, public health campaigns have very actively targeted that group to eliminate the disparity. “But the messaging may have overshadowed a balanced perception of risks for other diseases,” she says. African Americans are also at higher risk of heart disease.

Heart disease—the number one killer of all Americans, female and male—has its own awareness campaign, of course. February is Heart Health Month, when women are encouraged to wear red. Celebrities and brands join in to sound the call, but it’s safe to say that pink has better recognition.

While breast cancer awareness is, of course, vitally important, the perception of lower risk for heart disease could lead many women to see their hearts as less in need of attention.

Barnett says that could lead to lower participation in screenings that are crucial for keeping your heart strong, like checking if you have high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and diabetes.

"A lot of people expect to see physical symptoms of heart disease but that is not always the case,” he says. “Even if you are an active and seemingly healthy person, you need to be talking with your primary care doctor about heart health.”

Of course, it’s not a question of heart vs. breast—and there’s a lot of common ground between the two causes.

In terms of how to gain more awareness for our tickers, Kapp would like to see both breast cancer and heart health get equal billing when it comes to campaigns. And rather than having them compete against each other for attention in the national dialog, Kapp would prefer the “stronger together” approach.

“We would love to see pink and red join forces for combined messaging,” she says. She notes that many of the things advocated for in each campaign—upping your physical activity, maintaining a healthy body weight, eating healthy foods, and other common-sense strategies—all work well to ward off breast cancer and keep your heart happy.

“Encouraging healthy lifestyle changes can contribute to both heart and breast health,” she says, “so you’re addressing both at the same time.”

GoHealth Urgent Care Center Opens Monday In Former King Of Falafel Storefront

Souce: Hoodline

By Stephen Jackson

October 22, 2016

 

This coming Monday, October 24th, the medical facility-rich environment that is Lower Pac Heights will gain a new healthcare center. 

GoHealth Urgent Care...

GoHealth Urgent Care Center Opens Monday In Former King Of Falafel Storefront

Souce: Hoodline

By Stephen Jackson

October 22, 2016

 

This coming Monday, October 24th, the medical facility-rich environment that is Lower Pac Heights will gain a new healthcare center. 

GoHealth Urgent Care, which seeks to treat minor injuries that require immediate care in partnership with Dignity Health, is set to open its door in the former King of Falafel location.

After 40 years in business at the corner of Divisadero and Bush, King of Falafel shuttered last December.

GoHealth Urgent Care has been on a spree, opening a handful of new locations around the city this year. Back in July, we reported that a GoHealth Urgent Care center had opened up shop in the Castro, in the space formerly occupied by Radio Shack. Additional locations followed earlier this month in Glen Park, Cole Valley, and the Excelsior.

The Lower Pac Heights center marks the fifth GoHealth Urgent Care in San Francisco. The company plans to open a dozen such facilities in the next year.

Chuck Kruger, President of North California GoHealth Urgent Care, says Monday's opening "is a very exciting milestone, as we will now be able to offer the residents of Lower Pacific Heights convenient, expert care in the heart of their neighborhood. As part of our patient-focused approach, we have partnered with Dignity Health to ensure that the community is treated with the highest quality of care.”

The center will be open 8am-8pm Mondays through Fridays, and 8am-5pm on weekends. Appointments are scheduled through the mobile app or by visiting the website here.

Dignity Health, GoHealth Urgent Care and Uber Team Up to Offer Health and Wellness Services to Drivers with Uber and their Families

 

SAN FRANCISCO (Oct. 19, 2016)

On Demand Economy Drives a New Model for Consumer-friendly Health Services

Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health systems, and GoHealth Urgent Care, one of the nation's fastest growing urgent care...

Dignity Health, GoHealth Urgent Care and Uber Team Up to Offer Health and Wellness Services to Drivers with Uber and their Families

 

SAN FRANCISCO (Oct. 19, 2016)

On Demand Economy Drives a New Model for Consumer-friendly Health Services

Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health systems, and GoHealth Urgent Care, one of the nation's fastest growing urgent care companies, have announced a new partnership with Uber, the world’s premier ride sharing company.  Through the partnership, Dignity Health and GoHealth Urgent Care will provide seamless access to health and wellness services to people who drive with Uber and their families. The program launches today in all Dignity Health-GoHealth Urgent Care centers in San Francisco and will go-live shortly in additional GoHealth Urgent Care markets, including New York and Portland, Oregon, as well as other Dignity Health locations.

“We are excited to partner with Dignity Health and GoHealth Urgent Care to connect Bay Area drivers and their families to convenient, affordable health and wellness options that fit around their lives – and not the other way around,” said Wayne Ting, Uber’s Bay Area General Manager.

At the outset, drivers with Uber and their families will have access to $0 out-of-pocket flu shots for a limited time at Dignity Health-GoHealth Urgent Care centers throughout San Francisco, as well as a series of health education and wellness classes designed to meet their unique needs.

“We are thrilled to offer our effortless patient experience to drivers with Uber and their families,” said Todd Latz, Chief Executive Officer of GoHealth Urgent Care.  “We believe that the on-demand economy calls for more on-demand services in healthcare. Our simple online check-in feature will give drivers even more  control – they can “wait” before they arrive and be at the front of the line when they do.  Our extended hours and broad network of centers – four in the Bay Area today, seven by the end of the year and many more to come in 2017 -  make care easier to access, and will ensure that drivers with Uber and their families can avoid unnecessary and costly visits to the emergency room.”

“With today’s technology, healthcare providers have the opportunity to listen to consumers in real time and deliver personalized health and wellness services,” said Rich Roth, Chief Strategic Innovation Officer at Dignity Health. “We’re excited to serve drivers with Uber and their families and believe this breakthrough partnership is an important step toward making care delivery more convenient and increasingly accessible to everyone.”

For more information, visit www.GoHealthUC.com\uber  

About GoHealth Urgent Care

At GoHealth Urgent Care, we place the needs of our patients first—by providing an effortless patient experience, a welcoming culture of care and seamless integration with market-leading health systems and our communities. GoHealth Urgent Care operates 50 urgent care centers in the New York and Portland, OR, metropolitan areas, and San Francisco Bay Area. GoHealth Urgent Care’s current partners include health systems that are at the forefront of care delivery innovation, including Northwell Health (f/k/a/ North Shore-LIJ), New York's largest health system, Legacy Health, the largest nonprofit, locally owned health system in the Portland-Vancouver area, and Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health care systems, headquartered in San Francisco. GoHealth Urgent Care is a d/b/a of Access Clinical Partners, LLC, a TPG Growth portfolio company. TPG Growth, which is headquartered in San Francisco, is the middle market and growth equity investment platform of TPG, which has approximately $70 billion of assets under management. To learn more, please visit: www.gohealthUC.com

About Dignity Health

Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health care systems, is a 22-state network of more than 9,000 physicians, 62,000 employees, and 400 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health, and primary care centers. Headquartered in San Francisco, Dignity Health is dedicated to providing compassionate, high-quality, and affordable patient-centered care with special attention to the poor and underserved. In FY16, Dignity Health provided $2.2 billion in charitable care and services. You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

About Uber

Uber’s mission is to make transportation as reliable as running water—everywhere, for everyone. We started in 2010 to solve a simple problem: how do you get a ride at the touch of a button? Six years and over a billion trips later, we’ve started tackling an even greater challenge: reducing congestion and pollution in our cities by getting more people into fewer cars.

 

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