GoHealth Urgent Care News

Legacy GoHealth partners with Uber

Souce: Portland Business Journal

By Elizabeth Hayes

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are partnering with Uber to bring health care services to the thousands of Portland residents who are driv...

Legacy GoHealth partners with Uber

Souce: Portland Business Journal

By Elizabeth Hayes

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are partnering with Uber to bring health care services to the thousands of Portland residents who are drivers for the ridesharing company.

“What we love about Portland is what a sophisticated health care market it is,” said Todd Latz, CEO of GoHealth Urgent Care, based in Atlanta. “One of the areas we identified as we looked at the market is the on-demand economy, gig workers who hadn’t had as much access to services.”

Among the services available to drivers and their families are free flu shots, sports physicals and wellness classes.

Latz said GoHealth streamlined the online check-in system for drivers. Those who buy insurance on their own through the health exchange can use those benefits. Those who are uninsured will enjoy special pricing, Latz said.

Legacy-GoHealth has grown to 18 urgent care centers around Portland.

This is the third health care partnership for Uber, which entered into similar agreements with Dignity Health-GoHealth Urgent Care in San Francisco and Northwell Health-GoHealth Urgent Care in New York.

Legacy Health to provide healthcare for Uber drivers

Source: KPTV 

By Fox 12 Staff

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are teaming up to provide healthcare options for Uber drivers.

The partnership will provide tailored healthcare services...

Legacy Health to provide healthcare for Uber drivers

Source: KPTV 

By Fox 12 Staff

November 15, 2016

 

Legacy Health and GoHealth Urgent Care are teaming up to provide healthcare options for Uber drivers.

The partnership will provide tailored healthcare services to Uber drivers at 18 co-branded centers.

Some of the services include free flu shots, physical wellness classes and medical screening.

The initiative marks a significant change in the way companies like Uber provide access to healthcare.

"I'm doing well by doing good, I guess. I need a flu shot and I'm sure Uber needs me not to be sick when all the nastiness comes on. I'm happy to get one," said Uber driver, Matthew Workman.

The initiative will have an online service cutting down waiting times for patients.

Families of Uber drivers can also take advantage of some services.

Is Raising Awareness For Women's Health, Is Pink Overshadowing Red?

Source: Self

By Elizabeth Millard

October 24, 2016

 

Recognizing heart disease, the leading cause of death in women.

There’s no denying the power of breast cancer awareness efforts—esp...

Is Raising Awareness For Women's Health, Is Pink Overshadowing Red?

Source: Self

By Elizabeth Millard

October 24, 2016

 

Recognizing heart disease, the leading cause of death in women.

There’s no denying the power of breast cancer awareness efforts—especially in October, a month-long campaign that features everything from special jerseys on NFL players to marathon fundraising walks to pink ribbons everywhere.

Creating greater awareness of breast cancer is crucial for persuading more women to have regular screenings, and is credited with contributing to a decrease in death rates from the disease over the last couple decades. But there may be an unintended consequence to the effectiveness of the campaign: The actual leading cause of death in women—heart disease—is getting less play. And that could be dangerous, some experts believe.

It isn't called the silent killer for nothing. “Women are much more likely than men to have ‘atypical’ symptoms of heart disease, which can make it challenging to know when there’s an issue,” Andy Barnett, M.D., medical director of Legacy Health-GoHealth Urgent Care, tells SELF. That's why it's so important for women to be proactive in taking steps to ensure their hearts are healthy, he says. But many don't realize they need to be.

While breast cancer is getting a top spot in health perception nationwide, women are neglecting to realize the dangers of heart disease. Is it possible that pink’s prominence is causing an unintended, negative impact on women’s heart health?

Even when it comes to health issues, marketing is a really powerful tool.

Researchers at the University of Missouri were struck by how recent studies indicated that the U.S. has a disadvantage in women’s life expectancycompared to peer countries, despite high rates of health screenings like mammography and breast cancer awareness.

They decided to look at perception of risk, and asked about 600 women aged 35 to 49 about breast cancer risk versus heart disease risk. The researchers found that minority women and those with lower education levels were significantly more likely to believe that breast cancer causes more deaths among women than heart disease, according to lead researcher Julie Kapp, M.P.H, Ph.D., associate professor at the University of Missouri School of Medicine.

“We were not especially surprised by the findings, given the pink ribbon is one of the most widely recognized symbols in the United States and may lead to the perception that it (breast cancer) causes more deaths,” she says.

It doesn't. The number one cause of death for women in the U.S. is heart disease, followed by all cancers, among which breast cancer ranks as the second-most deadly. About 40,450 women are expected to die from breast cancer in the U.S this year, according to breastcancer.org—that's around 1 in 30. As many as 1 in 3 women die each year from cardiovascular disease or stroke—more than from all cancers combined.

The misperception can be especially prevalent among African American women, Kapp adds. Because they are more likely than Caucasian women to die from breast cancer, public health campaigns have very actively targeted that group to eliminate the disparity. “But the messaging may have overshadowed a balanced perception of risks for other diseases,” she says. African Americans are also at higher risk of heart disease.

Heart disease—the number one killer of all Americans, female and male—has its own awareness campaign, of course. February is Heart Health Month, when women are encouraged to wear red. Celebrities and brands join in to sound the call, but it’s safe to say that pink has better recognition.

While breast cancer awareness is, of course, vitally important, the perception of lower risk for heart disease could lead many women to see their hearts as less in need of attention.

Barnett says that could lead to lower participation in screenings that are crucial for keeping your heart strong, like checking if you have high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and diabetes.

"A lot of people expect to see physical symptoms of heart disease but that is not always the case,” he says. “Even if you are an active and seemingly healthy person, you need to be talking with your primary care doctor about heart health.”

Of course, it’s not a question of heart vs. breast—and there’s a lot of common ground between the two causes.

In terms of how to gain more awareness for our tickers, Kapp would like to see both breast cancer and heart health get equal billing when it comes to campaigns. And rather than having them compete against each other for attention in the national dialog, Kapp would prefer the “stronger together” approach.

“We would love to see pink and red join forces for combined messaging,” she says. She notes that many of the things advocated for in each campaign—upping your physical activity, maintaining a healthy body weight, eating healthy foods, and other common-sense strategies—all work well to ward off breast cancer and keep your heart happy.

“Encouraging healthy lifestyle changes can contribute to both heart and breast health,” she says, “so you’re addressing both at the same time.”

GoHealth Urgent Care Center Opens Monday In Former King Of Falafel Storefront

Souce: Hoodline

By Stephen Jackson

October 22, 2016

 

This coming Monday, October 24th, the medical facility-rich environment that is Lower Pac Heights will gain a new healthcare center. 

GoHealth Urgent Care...

GoHealth Urgent Care Center Opens Monday In Former King Of Falafel Storefront

Souce: Hoodline

By Stephen Jackson

October 22, 2016

 

This coming Monday, October 24th, the medical facility-rich environment that is Lower Pac Heights will gain a new healthcare center. 

GoHealth Urgent Care, which seeks to treat minor injuries that require immediate care in partnership with Dignity Health, is set to open its door in the former King of Falafel location.

After 40 years in business at the corner of Divisadero and Bush, King of Falafel shuttered last December.

GoHealth Urgent Care has been on a spree, opening a handful of new locations around the city this year. Back in July, we reported that a GoHealth Urgent Care center had opened up shop in the Castro, in the space formerly occupied by Radio Shack. Additional locations followed earlier this month in Glen Park, Cole Valley, and the Excelsior.

The Lower Pac Heights center marks the fifth GoHealth Urgent Care in San Francisco. The company plans to open a dozen such facilities in the next year.

Chuck Kruger, President of North California GoHealth Urgent Care, says Monday's opening "is a very exciting milestone, as we will now be able to offer the residents of Lower Pacific Heights convenient, expert care in the heart of their neighborhood. As part of our patient-focused approach, we have partnered with Dignity Health to ensure that the community is treated with the highest quality of care.”

The center will be open 8am-8pm Mondays through Fridays, and 8am-5pm on weekends. Appointments are scheduled through the mobile app or by visiting the website here.

Dignity Health, GoHealth Urgent Care and Uber Team Up to Offer Health and Wellness Services to Drivers with Uber and their Families

 

SAN FRANCISCO (Oct. 19, 2016)

On Demand Economy Drives a New Model for Consumer-friendly Health Services

Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health systems, and GoHealth Urgent Care, one of the nation's fastest growing urgent care...

Dignity Health, GoHealth Urgent Care and Uber Team Up to Offer Health and Wellness Services to Drivers with Uber and their Families

 

SAN FRANCISCO (Oct. 19, 2016)

On Demand Economy Drives a New Model for Consumer-friendly Health Services

Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health systems, and GoHealth Urgent Care, one of the nation's fastest growing urgent care companies, have announced a new partnership with Uber, the world’s premier ride sharing company.  Through the partnership, Dignity Health and GoHealth Urgent Care will provide seamless access to health and wellness services to people who drive with Uber and their families. The program launches today in all Dignity Health-GoHealth Urgent Care centers in San Francisco and will go-live shortly in additional GoHealth Urgent Care markets, including New York and Portland, Oregon, as well as other Dignity Health locations.

“We are excited to partner with Dignity Health and GoHealth Urgent Care to connect Bay Area drivers and their families to convenient, affordable health and wellness options that fit around their lives – and not the other way around,” said Wayne Ting, Uber’s Bay Area General Manager.

At the outset, drivers with Uber and their families will have access to $0 out-of-pocket flu shots for a limited time at Dignity Health-GoHealth Urgent Care centers throughout San Francisco, as well as a series of health education and wellness classes designed to meet their unique needs.

“We are thrilled to offer our effortless patient experience to drivers with Uber and their families,” said Todd Latz, Chief Executive Officer of GoHealth Urgent Care.  “We believe that the on-demand economy calls for more on-demand services in healthcare. Our simple online check-in feature will give drivers even more  control – they can “wait” before they arrive and be at the front of the line when they do.  Our extended hours and broad network of centers – four in the Bay Area today, seven by the end of the year and many more to come in 2017 -  make care easier to access, and will ensure that drivers with Uber and their families can avoid unnecessary and costly visits to the emergency room.”

“With today’s technology, healthcare providers have the opportunity to listen to consumers in real time and deliver personalized health and wellness services,” said Rich Roth, Chief Strategic Innovation Officer at Dignity Health. “We’re excited to serve drivers with Uber and their families and believe this breakthrough partnership is an important step toward making care delivery more convenient and increasingly accessible to everyone.”

For more information, visit www.GoHealthUC.com\uber  

About GoHealth Urgent Care

At GoHealth Urgent Care, we place the needs of our patients first—by providing an effortless patient experience, a welcoming culture of care and seamless integration with market-leading health systems and our communities. GoHealth Urgent Care operates 50 urgent care centers in the New York and Portland, OR, metropolitan areas, and San Francisco Bay Area. GoHealth Urgent Care’s current partners include health systems that are at the forefront of care delivery innovation, including Northwell Health (f/k/a/ North Shore-LIJ), New York's largest health system, Legacy Health, the largest nonprofit, locally owned health system in the Portland-Vancouver area, and Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health care systems, headquartered in San Francisco. GoHealth Urgent Care is a d/b/a of Access Clinical Partners, LLC, a TPG Growth portfolio company. TPG Growth, which is headquartered in San Francisco, is the middle market and growth equity investment platform of TPG, which has approximately $70 billion of assets under management. To learn more, please visit: www.gohealthUC.com

About Dignity Health

Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health care systems, is a 22-state network of more than 9,000 physicians, 62,000 employees, and 400 care centers, including hospitals, urgent and occupational care, imaging centers, home health, and primary care centers. Headquartered in San Francisco, Dignity Health is dedicated to providing compassionate, high-quality, and affordable patient-centered care with special attention to the poor and underserved. In FY16, Dignity Health provided $2.2 billion in charitable care and services. You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

About Uber

Uber’s mission is to make transportation as reliable as running water—everywhere, for everyone. We started in 2010 to solve a simple problem: how do you get a ride at the touch of a button? Six years and over a billion trips later, we’ve started tackling an even greater challenge: reducing congestion and pollution in our cities by getting more people into fewer cars.

 

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How to Cure Your Wedding Hangover Before Your Honeymoon Travels

Source:  Brides

By Cheryl S. Grant

October 19, 2016

 

You booked your flight months in advance for your much desired honeymoon but that was before your big wedding celebration. A few champagne toasts, shots at the ...

How to Cure Your Wedding Hangover Before Your Honeymoon Travels

Source:  Brides

By Cheryl S. Grant

October 19, 2016

 

You booked your flight months in advance for your much desired honeymoon but that was before your big wedding celebration. A few champagne toasts, shots at the bar and before you know it you have had too much to drink. Ugh! Now the idea of getting on a flight with what seems like a rock band playing in your head is all too daunting. Before hitting the friendly skies try the below tips to make the start of your honeymoon less than painful.

Night Cap

To mitigate the damage of the next day start the night before. "Before hitting the sack drink water and pop a painkiller" says Robert Korn, MD, Medical Director at Northwell Health — GoHealth Urgent Care."If possible avoid Aspirin and Ibuprofen as they may irritate an already delicate stomach." he says. Make sure you take them with lots and lots of water.

Hydrate

Though we have often heard that drinking something like a Bloody Mary in the morning can help to balance a hangover — hair of the dog and all — experts say that may not be a great idea because it just delays the onset of symptoms. "Hydration is key," says Patricia Bannan, MS, RD, author of Eat Right When Time is Tight. "My go-to is a pomegranate juice spritzer," she says. One glass of pomegranate juice has 600mg of potassium, which can provide much needed electrolytes. Bannan combines one part each of POM 100% pomegranate juice and sparkling water, with a twist of lime.

Skip the Espresso

Since your stomach is probably a little wonky try sticking to things that will soothe your system. Though a caffeine kick may seem like a quick picker upper it may do more harm than good. "Coffee can narrow your blood vessels and increase your blood pressure, adding to your symptoms," says Bannan. Above all avoid acidic and greasy foods. The best choices are fresh fruit, yogurt, eggs and cereals that will help to replace some of the lost nutrients.

See More: A Wedding Favor Your Guests Will Actually Use? Hangover Kits

Hit The Sack

Once you're en route to your honeymoon destination close your eyes and sleep because chances are you are deprived. "Alcohol impairs delta sleep — the part of sleep that makes you feel rested, says Korn. So, even if you had gotten to bed and had 8 hours of "sleep time," if you drank too much the night before, you will get too little delta sleep, and you will be tired, says Korn.

Skip It or Sip It

Though these tips can help you feel a little better, prevention is still better than any cure. If you truly want to feel your best for your honeymoon abstinence or moderation is key. So know when to say when to start your new life sans the giant headache and nausea.

News At 930 Cole: Final Tenant Added, GoHealth Gets Opening Date, Departed Pet Mural To Be Recreated

Source: Hoodline

By Walter Thompson

October 11, 2016

 

Over the last 18 months, the century-old former auto garage at 930 Cole St. has been transformed into a retail space that will bring three new businesses to the h...

News At 930 Cole: Final Tenant Added, GoHealth Gets Opening Date, Departed Pet Mural To Be Recreated

Source: Hoodline

By Walter Thompson

October 11, 2016

 

Over the last 18 months, the century-old former auto garage at 930 Cole St. has been transformed into a retail space that will bring three new businesses to the heart of Cole Valley. The departure of Cole Garage was felt deeply by many long-time residents, but the building's owner and new tenants say they're working to be good neighbors.

The 9,600-square-foot building has already announced two tenants: GoHealth Urgent Care and Urban Sol Yoga. Now, they've signed up a third: a still-undisclosed women's boutique, according to Linda Hothem, CEO of Pacific American Group, the building's owner. (Neighboring restaurant Zazie had been contemplating opening a second location in the third space, but ultimately passed.)

The building is still being prepared, and a ridge skylight over a new corridor for the yoga studio should be finished in approximately two months, Hothem said via email. "The facade painting, signage and exterior is [our] top priority to complete," she added. "We hope to wrap that up within the next 30 days."

GoHealth Urgent Care will be the first of the three new businesses to debut, with plans to open on Monday, October 17th, according to COO Gary Weatherford. 

This week, workers installed a projecting wall sign with the center's logo, and in sidewalk conversations and on social media, some Cole Valley residents expressed dismay at the signage, which received Planning approval for nighttime illumination. 

"Given the look, dimensions and feedback," GoHealth and Pacific American Group mutually decided the sign was a poor fit, said Hothem. Yesterday afternoon, a work crew on a scissor lift wrapped the sign in canvas. 

Although GoHealth worked with community groups before mounting the sign, Weatherford said he hoped to instead install a new treatment that's more in keeping with surrounding businesses. 

"We decided yesterday to paint the name and logo on the building instead of signs," said Hothem, who added that a blade sign mounted perpendicular to the building's facade "is still under consideration."

"GoHealth is very considerate of the neighborhood, and is trying to get this signage issue dealt with respectfully," Hothem said.

This morning, painters started covering the building's facade, which includes an extensive mural of beloved and departed Cole Valley pets. Weatherford said the plan is for a new mural featuring all of the departed pets, and noted that Hothem is in talks with Angela Tirrell, the muralist who was commissioned by former garage owner Dirk Spencer in 2008. 

The original mural reached from sidewalk to roofline, growing over time after residents contacted Spencer to ask that their pet be included.

"Linda [Hothem] had always intended for the mural to be recreated," said Weatherford, and via email, artist Tirrell confirmed that she's in the "research stage" for recreating the mural on a large fabric panel that "would stretch across the evening protection metal gate, to soften the entrance." According to Tirrell, some Cole Valley Fair attendees said the gate "seems [like] a strong visual which the neighborhood is not used to."

Tirrell said Pacific American Group and architect Saul Pichardo "are entirely committed to re-creating the portraits of each and every pet from the original mural." In the meantime, she's looking into ecologically sound inks, paints and solvents to use on the new piece.

"I am very grateful that the garage's spirit is being preserved, and that all the neighbors who are patrons of this neighborhood mural will see their pets newly created in a cool new format," said Tirrell.

How A Teen's Ingrown Toenail Led To Amputating Her Leg

Souce: Self

By Korin Miller

October 6, 2016

 

Her doctors advised her against it—but she's happy she chose to do it.

A teenager from the U.K. paid to have her leg amputated after suffering...

How A Teen's Ingrown Toenail Led To Amputating Her Leg

Souce: Self

By Korin Miller

October 6, 2016

 

Her doctors advised her against it—but she's happy she chose to do it.

A teenager from the U.K. paid to have her leg amputated after suffering a painful complication from surgery to remove an ingrown toenail. Hannah Moore says that she went through “three years of hell” after her toenail surgery, with even slight touch to her right leg putting her in unbearable pain.

"The past three years have been an absolute nightmare,” she tells the Daily Mail. “It's amazing how much my life changed just because of an ingrown toenail.” At one point, Moore was taking 40 different types of medication for her pain.

Doctors diagnosed the 19-year-old with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a painful condition that a person can develop after having minor surgery. CRPS caused Moore’s foot to turn black, and a flesh-eating hole appeared in the middle of her foot. Finally, she decided to pay more than $6,000 have her leg amputated in July, even though her doctors advised her not to (they warned the pain could return in the remaining part of her leg).

But, Moore says, it was the right decision for her. “I couldn't be happier now that I've had my leg amputated,” she said. “Thankfully I've been pain-free ever since and now I'm finally making up for lost time and getting my life back on track.”

Moore’s story is terrifying, but experts say CRPS happens—it’s just rare for it to become so severe.

Medhat Mikhael, M.D., pain management specialist and medical director of the non-operative program at California’s Center for Spine Health at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center, tells SELF that CRPS isn’t common, but it’s not totally uncommon either. “You’re not going to see it with every surgery or injury a patient has, and the majority don’t develop it, but it happens,” he says. However, he adds, doctors are usually on top of it. “We’re able to diagnose it and detect it early,” he says.

Gregory Carroll, M.D., president of Legacy-GoHealth Urgent Care, tells SELF that CRPS is more common in people between the ages of 20 and 35, and typically impacts women more than men. Most cases happen after an arm or leg suffers a forceful trauma, like a crush injury or fraction, but surgery, infections, and even sprained ankles can cause CRPS, Carroll says.

Doctors just aren’t sure why some people develop CRPS. “It might be because of a dysfunctional interaction between the central and peripheral nervous systems and inappropriate inflammatory responses,” Carroll says, adding that it’s really “not well understood.”

CRPS symptoms vary in severity and duration, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. “Studies of the incidence and prevalence of the disease show that most cases are mild and individuals recover gradually with time,” the organization says. “In more severe cases, individuals may not recover and may have long-term disability.”

Symptoms typically include constant burning or throbbing pain, usually in a person’s arm, leg, hand, or foot, sensitivity to touch, swelling, changes in skin temperature and color, and a decreased ability to move the affected body part, Carroll says.

Mikhael stresses that amputation is not the solution for CRPS. “It’s not the right move whatsoever,” he says.

In fact, Morton Tavel, M.D., a clinical professor of medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine, tells SELF that a CRPS patient who undergoes amputation is at risk of a more widespread pain syndrome. Mikhael cites “phantom limb pain,” ongoing pain that seems to be coming from a part of their limb that is no longer there, as a possibility. “That is sometimes impossible to treat,” he says.

If CRPS is left untreated, it can become severe and chronic, Mikhael says, but if it’s caught early, there are several treatments doctors can use to stop it.

Those include antidepressants and anticonvulsants, corticosteroids (to reduce inflammation and improve mobility), physical therapy to exercise the limb, and psychotherapy, since CRPS is often associated with psychological symptoms like depression, anxiety or PTSD, Carroll says.

If you have an injury or minor surgery and notice you’re starting to exhibit symptoms of CRPS, doctors say it’s important to speak up. The earlier it’s detected, the better it can be treated. However, you shouldn’t freak out and stress that you’ll develop CRPS after a minor surgery. “The average person need not worry about this condition,” Tavel says.

 

New GoHealth Urgent Care Center Now Open On Diamond Street

Souce: Hoodline

By Stephen Jackson

October 5, 2016

 

Glen Park's main drag doesn't see a lot of retail turnovers, but you may have noticed a new addition recently. GoHealth Urgent Care, which seeks to treat minor in...

New GoHealth Urgent Care Center Now Open On Diamond Street

Souce: Hoodline

By Stephen Jackson

October 5, 2016

 

Glen Park's main drag doesn't see a lot of retail turnovers, but you may have noticed a new addition recently. GoHealth Urgent Care, which seeks to treat minor injuries requiring immediate care in partnership with Dignity Health, opened its doors on Diamond Street last week.

Back in July, we reported that a GoHealth Urgent Care center had opened up shop in the Castro, in the space formerly occupied by Radio Shack, and that more SF locations were planned in the coming months. The Glen Park location is the second to open in the city, and locations in Cole Valley and the Excelsior are set to open on October 17th, followed by a Lower Pacific Heights location on Oct. 24th.

GoHealth centers seek to add convenience by locating centers in highly trafficked commercial areas that are easily accessible by local residents. The company currently operates centers in the Portland and New York metro areas, and, most recently, the San Francisco Bay Area.

Costs are kept down by lean staffing practices: each center is operated by one medical professional (a doctor, nurse practitioner, physician's assistant) and a radiology technician. According to a statement from our previous article, one GoHealth center might see 36 patients in a given 12-hour day.

Chuck Kruger, President of Northern California GoHealth Urgent Care, expressed his excitement about the new location. "Glen Park residents have many stores, restaurants and transit options available within a short walking distance, and with GoHealth Urgent Care now open in the neighborhood they also have a high-quality, convenient and affordable resource for their health care needs," Kruger said.

He continued, "In addition, our partnership with Dignity Health ensures that the highest level of care is given to our patients not only for their urgent care visit but for any needed follow-up care with Dignity Health’s many primary care physicians and specialists.”

The facility is now open and accepting patients. GoHealth encourages prospective patients to use its website or app to schedule appointments and determine wait times. The Glen Park facility is open from 8am to 8pm, Monday through Friday, and 9am to 5pm on weekends. 

GoHealth plans to open a dozen facilities around the Bay Area in the next year.

Here's What To Do If You Accidentally Chop Off Your Finger

Source: Self

By Amy Marturana

October 4, 2016

 

Lindsay Lohan lost part of her finger in a boating accident. Here’s what to do if this happens to you.

Over the weekend, Lindsay Lohan lost part of her ring...

Here's What To Do If You Accidentally Chop Off Your Finger

Source: Self

By Amy Marturana

October 4, 2016

 

Lindsay Lohan lost part of her finger in a boating accident. Here’s what to do if this happens to you.

Over the weekend, Lindsay Lohan lost part of her ring finger in a boating accident. TMZ reportsthat the actress was pulling up the anchor and her finger got caught. Lohan later tweeted (then deleted her tweet) that the bottom part of the finger was ripped off. Luckily, her friends found the detached piece and rushed her to a hospital, where a plastic surgeon was able to reattach it.

Even if you aren’t cruising on a boat off the coast of Turkey like LiLo, chances are you’ve been in a situation where your fingers were at risk (read: in the kitchen with a sharp knife). So what should you do if you ever find yourself with a major gash or a severed digit?

Robert Korn, M.D., medical director of Northwell Health GoHealth Urgent Care, tells SELF that if you cut off part of your finger, the first thing you need to do is apply direct pressure to the wound with a clean cloth or piece of clothing. “Apply enough pressure so that it does not bleed through this covering,” Korn says. “It can usually be applied with the non-injured hand by grasping your fist around the injured finger with a cloth and squeezing.” Then, get to a doctor ASAP, while maintaining pressure to prevent blood loss.

If you can locate the detached piece, it’s important to keep it clean so it’s viable for reattachment. Korn says to wrap it in gauze or a clean cloth, and put it in an airtight sealable bag, like a Ziploc. Combine ice and water in a bowl or bucket big enough for the plastic bag you just put the digit into. “Put the sealed plastic bag in this ice/water mixture. Make sure that no water gets into the plastic bag, and transport with [you] to medical care.” If water gets into the bag and touches the delicate tissue, “it will cause swelling making the part harder to attach,” Korn says. Freezing water can also cause cell damage. “Ideally, doctors want the amputated part cool, not frozen.”

Whether or not a doctor is able to save your finger depends on both the nature of the injury and the state of both the remaining finger and the unattached part. According to the National Institutes of Health, risks of replantation (reattachment) surgery include bleeding, infection, death of tissue, reduced nerve function, stiffness, and pain that continues after surgery. “The decision to reattach is usually made by a trained hand surgeon who can decide if the risks of replantation, which are not minor, are worth it,” Korn says.

If you badly cut yourself but everything’s still in one piece, apply pressure until bleeding stops—it should relatively quickly unless you’re taking blood thinners. If a cut continues to bleed after a few hours of pressure, seek medical help. Additionally, any cut that’s further than skin deep deserves a doctor’s attention. “Any time you can see exposed underlying structures, including tendon, bone, fat, or nerve bundles, the wound will need to be seen by a professional,” Korn says. Any numbness, mobility problems, or change in color “downstream” of the injury (the side away from your body) is a sign you should get it looked at. If you ignore it, you risk serious infection (in rare cases, life-threatening sepsis) and potentially loss of function or amputation.

In either situation, stopping the bleeding and keeping all your body parts—the attached ones and detached ones—clean and preserved will give you the best shot at coming out on the other side with all 10 fingers intact.

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