GoHealth Urgent Care News

GoHealth Urgent Care and Mercy Partner to Create Premier Network of Patient-Focused Urgent Care Centers in Multiple Midwest Markets

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GoHealth Urgent Care and Mercy Partner to Create Premier Network of Patient-Focused Urgent Care Centers in Multiple Midwest Markets

GoHealth Urgent Care and Mercy Partner to Create Premier Network of Patient-Focused Urgent Care Centers in Multiple Midwest Markets

Fastest Growing Partnership-Oriented Urgent Care Provider Expands National Presence through Joint Venture with one of the Nation’s Most Innovative and Integrated Health Systems

St. Louis, Mo. (Jan. 3, 2018) — GoHealth Urgent Care, one of the nation’s fastest-growing ...

GoHealth Urgent Care and Mercy Partner to Create Premier Network of Patient-Focused Urgent Care Centers in Multiple Midwest Markets

Fastest Growing Partnership-Oriented Urgent Care Provider Expands National Presence through Joint Venture with one of the Nation’s Most Innovative and Integrated Health Systems

St. Louis, Mo. (Jan. 3, 2018) GoHealth Urgent Care, one of the nation’s fastest-growing urgent care providers, and Mercy, one of the nation’s most innovative and integrated care delivery health systems,  today announced they have partnered to create a substantial network of urgent care centers across the Midwest that will put patients first and deliver superior care and convenience. The joint venture will provide patients in Missouri, Oklahoma and Arkansas with greater access to innovative urgent care through state-of-the-art technology and unique patient access tools—wherever and whenever they need it the most.

Mercy and GoHealth Urgent Care plan to open more than 30 co-branded Mercy-GoHealth Urgent Care centers over the next two years, with convenient retail locations throughout St. Louis, Springfield, Oklahoma City and Northwest Arkansas. The joint venture will begin serving Mercy communities this summer, combining GoHealth Urgent Care’s industry-leading patient satisfaction ratings, technological advancements and award-winning center and website designs with Mercy’s long-standing reputation for high-quality, fully integrated acute and ambulatory health services. With these new Mercy-GoHealth Urgent Care centers, GoHealth Urgent Care will become one of the nation’s five largest urgent care companies.

Each Mercy-GoHealth Urgent Care center will operate seven days a week with extended evening hours, welcome walk-in patients and offer online pre-registration and check-in to ensure that patients can access providers as quickly as possible and control when and where they are seen. The centers will feature electrostatic “smart glass” procedure rooms, transparent charting on a wide screen in each exam room, mobile x-ray equipment and Mercy’s unified electronic health record (EHR), including the user-friendly MyMercy patient portal. The utilization of an integrated EHR will allow caregivers across the entire Mercy system immediate access to relevant and important patient medical history and information, helping to ensure continuity and the highest levels of care.

“We could not be more excited to partner with Mercy, as our mission to create a culture of care, seamless integration with the broader health care continuum and effortless patient experiences in urgent care is in complete alignment with what Mercy provides to each of its communities,” said Todd Latz, CEO of GoHealth Urgent Care. “Through robust collaboration and the combination of our respective innovative approaches to care, our joint venture will offer a differentiated and superior level of consumer-focused urgent care that is not currently available in Mercy’s markets. We are really looking forward to improving access to clinical care by bringing this new experience to St. Louis, Springfield, Oklahoma City, Northwest Arkansas and beyond.”

Mercy has grown to 44 acute care and specialty hospitals with over 40,000 co-workers, and a multispecialty physician group with more than 2,000 physicians. Mercy has a long history of care innovation and was among the first organizations in the U.S. to have a comprehensive, integrated electronic health record. In addition, Mercy was named a “Most Wired” health care organization by the American Hospital Association in 2017 for the 14th time since 1999 and has created a nationally recognized Virtual Care Center.

“Our partnership with GoHealth Urgent Care will help fulfill our mission to transform health in our communities,” said Lynn Britton, Mercy’s CEO. “We are dedicated to delivering integrated, consumer-focused care through innovative models that are convenient to where our patients live, work and play. This joint venture further demonstrates Mercy’s leadership and focus on providing quality outcomes for the millions of patients who have entrusted us with their care.”

GoHealth Urgent Care continues to rapidly expand its footprint across the U.S. The urgent care provider has grown more than 10-fold since the beginning of 2015. GoHealth Urgent Care will continue to focus on patient-centered care and growth in 2018, as the company is poised to spearhead new groundbreaking health care initiatives and offerings for customers in existing markets, including New York, San Francisco, Portland and Hartford, as well as each of its new Midwest markets together with Mercy.

About GoHealth Urgent Care

GoHealth Urgent Care is one of the country’s fastest-growing and largest urgent care providers. At GoHealth Urgent Care, we place the needs of our patients first—by providing an effortless patient experience, a welcoming culture of care and seamless integration with market-leading health systems and our communities. GoHealth Urgent Care operates 80 urgent care centers in the New York and Portland, Oregon, metropolitan areas, the San Francisco Bay Area and Hartford, Connecticut, and will soon open urgent care centers in multiple Midwest markets. GoHealth Urgent Care’s current partners include health systems that are at the forefront of care delivery innovation, including Northwell Health, New York's largest health system, Legacy Health, the largest nonprofit, locally owned health system in the Portland-Vancouver area, Dignity Health, one of the nation’s largest health care systems, headquartered in San Francisco, Hartford HealthCare, Connecticut’s most comprehensive health care network, and now Mercy, one of the Midwest’s largest, most integrated and innovative health systems. GoHealth Urgent Care is a d/b/a of Access Clinical Partners, LLC, a TPG Growth portfolio company. TPG Growth is the middle market and growth equity investment platform of TPG, which has over $70 billion of assets under management. To learn more, please visit www.gohealthUC.com.

About Mercy

Mercy, named one of the top five large U.S. health systems in 2017 by Truven, an IBM Watson Health company, serves millions annually. Mercy includes 44 acute care and specialty (heart, children’s, orthopedic and rehab) hospitals, more than 700 physician practices and outpatient facilities, 40,000 co-workers and more than 2,000 Mercy Clinic physicians in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. Mercy also has outreach ministries in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. To learn more, please visit www.mercy.net.

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After-hours health care options have grown

Source: Connecticut Mirror

By Arielle Levin Becker

April 2, 2017

 

So you’re coming down with some sort of bug, and it’s Saturday afternoon – when your doctor’s office is closed.

If you want some medical hel...

After-hours health care options have grown

Source: Connecticut Mirror

By Arielle Levin Becker

April 2, 2017

 

So you’re coming down with some sort of bug, and it’s Saturday afternoon – when your doctor’s office is closed.

If you want some medical help but don’t need a trip to the emergency room, there are options aplenty: You could try that urgent care center down the road. There’s the clinic in the back of the drug store. You could try one of the new online services that let you video conference a doctor.

But what will you get from each of them? How do you decide where to go? And what does the proliferation of “convenience care” facilities mean for health care?

“The urgent care capacity in Connecticut has kind of exploded,” said Dr. Peter Bowers, medical director at Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield.

Proponents say that means patients now have more options for care at any time. That can help them avoid going to the emergency room for non-emergencies – and get care with less wait and at lower cost.

But some say there are tradeoffs. Some physician groups have raised concerns that the use of convenience care facilities leads to more fragmented care. Others have noted the facilities are more likely to be built in higher-income areas, rather than places where more people already struggle to access care.

And even with multiple options available, it can still be challenging for patients to figure out which is best for their particular symptoms, noted the authors of a 2015 report on retail clinics and urgent care centers in New York.

“Patients must navigate this rapidly changing world of ambulatory care services with limited information, at a time when symptoms and concerns about their health are already creating stress,” they wrote.

Here’s a look at the options and advice from experts on how to handle non-emergency after-hours medical needs.

For starters, it helps to know the difference between the various options.

In Connecticut, there’s no formal definition of what an urgent care facility or retail clinic is; they’re all licensed as outpatient medical facilities. (That could change; Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s administration has proposed creating a separate license for urgent care facilities.)

But experts and trade associations generally refer to them based on certain distinctions.

Retail clinics are generally located in other facilities; think CVS’ MinuteClinics or Walgreens’ health care clinics. They’re often staffed by nurse practitioners, and tend to offer a set list of services, including flu shots, testing for strep throat or other minor illnesses, or treatment of minor injuries.

Urgent care centers typically provide a broader range of services; many offer imaging services such as X-rays in addition to routine primary care. They’re often staffed by doctors or nurse practitioners. The ownership models vary; some are owned by hospitals or health systems, while some are owned by doctors or separate companies. Some hospitals now partner with urgent care centers; the Yale New Haven Health System recently announced a partnership with PhysicianOne Urgent Care, while Hartford Healthcare is opening facilities with the company GoHealth Urgent Care.

There’s also telemedicine, in which patients communicate with a health care provider by live video, usually on a smartphone or tablet. Some health care providers offer virtual visits to their existing patients. There are also services that provide telemedicine by connecting patients with doctors licensed in their state.

If you’re already sick after hours, this won’t help you, but use it for the future: Experts say the best thing to do is to ask your regular doctor what you should do in case you need care after hours or on a weekend. Ask before you need it.

Some medical practices have partnerships with certain urgent care facilities or other types of after-hours arrangements, which would make it easier for your records to be shared. You might even find out your doctor’s office has someone available to see you after hours. There’s been a push in recent years for primary care providers to improve after-hours access, and some now offer virtual visits through telemedicine, said Dr. Ann O’Malley, a physician and senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research, which has studied after-hours care.

“That’s really the first place to go, if it’s not a true emergency, is your own doctor,” she said. “Because they know you best. They have access to your medical records. They just have so much more information about you than a stranger would in another type of setting.”

“Continuity of care is very important,” she added. “Not only is it valued by patients and doctors, but it’s associated with much better quality of care and improved outcomes.”

Even if you haven’t done that prep work and you’re sick now, it’s worth a call to your primary care provider’s office, experts say.

“Most primary care providers have a live provider that will talk you through it and help you navigate that,” Bowers said.

If you’ve gone to an urgent care center or retail clinic, or done a virtual visit using telemedicine, experts say you should be sure to get a record of what happened so you can give it to your regular medical provider, or have a copy sent to your doctor.

“I do recommend that, empowering people to get documentation of what went on and why. That’s a good thing, because I think our system still is pretty fragmented,” Bowers said.

It’s a good practice even for something that seems minor, O’Malley said.

“There are lots of things that may seem fairly simple ... that could be signs of larger problems,” or another condition, she said. “It’s very important to close the loop as a patient if those practices or different entities don’t already communicate with one another or share records.”

O’Malley recommends keeping your primary care provider’s card in your wallet, so you can give his or her contact information to any other medical provider you see.

“It’s very important to close the loop as a patient if those practices or different entities don’t already communicate with one another or share records,” she said.

Brooklyn Reporter

Source: Brooklyn Reporter

By Meaghan McGoldrick

February 28, 2017

 

Northwell Health and GoHealth have expanded their footprint and opened the first Northwell Health-GoHealth Urgent Care facility in Brooklyn.

At ...

Brooklyn Reporter

Source: Brooklyn Reporter

By Meaghan McGoldrick

February 28, 2017

 

Northwell Health and GoHealth have expanded their footprint and opened the first Northwell Health-GoHealth Urgent Care facility in Brooklyn.

At home on Kent Avenue, the new facility – which officially opened on Monday, February 20 but celebrated its grand opening on Monday, February 27 – is the first of its kind for the borough, and comes on the heels of the success of the companies’ various urgent care locations across the city, in Westchester and on Long Island.

“This is really historic for us because this is our 34th opening in the New York market,” said Doron Stern, chief marketing officer for GoHealth. “But it’s also historic because it’s our first opening in Brooklyn, here in Williamsburg, which is a really fitting setting for us.”

When he thinks of Brooklyn, Stern said, he thinks of Williamsburg.

“I think about a sort of tale of two cities, if you will,” he told guests at the center’s grand opening, “because you have these old established communities in Brooklyn that’ve been around for decades – that sort of follow the same traditions and the same culture generation after generation – but then we have these new folks coming in, so there’s this super cool mingling of different dynamics.”

That mingling, he said, is reminiscent of the Northwell Health-GoHealth Urgent Care brand.

“This is not the same urgent care that’s been around for so long,” he said, stressing that, in keeping with the changing times, patients can check in to the facility online or on their smart phones. “We wanted to make it fresh, we wanted to make it inviting and we wanted to make it new.”

Vice President of Northwell Ventures Operations at Northwell Health Adam Boll agreed.

“We’re so excited about the endless possibilities here in Brooklyn,” said Boll, noting that, thanks to joint venture partnerships like that of Northwell and GoHealth, facilities like this can exist, and run smoothly. “We appreciate the warm welcome into the community.”

The center, he explained, utilizes an open design “centered around the patient,” which focuses heavily on comfort and care, as well as efficiency and technological advancement.

“[The center] flows very easily. You can see from the front to the back with no obstructions,” Boll pointed out, adding that the center utilizes electronically charged glass that the staff can either choose to make opaque to allow privacy, or keep clear and open to allow air-flow and visibility. In addition, he said, the systems in the rooms – which are all multi-purpose – have direct connections to Northwell’s emergency network, allowing its clinicians to send information directly to Northwell specialists.

“We’re really looking at top-of-the-line care, locally,” he said, “and that’s not something that’s easy to do, but thanks to our partnership with GoHealth, we’ve been able to make that happen.”

“We could not be more excited to be in this community,” added New York Market President for GoHealth Sarah Arora. “I love this location because it brings together this very integrated cross-section of demographics, ages and ethnicities and, in that way, it forces us to elevate our game, and to understand the community in a more specific way and really to cater to every patient as an individual.”

With residents of North Brooklyn often traveling to other boroughs like Queens and Manhattan for healthcare, this opening, Arora noted, was a long time coming.

“You should be able to get really high quality care in Williamsburg,” she said.

Also on hand for the grand opening were Northwell/GoHealth Medical Director Dr. Robert Korn, Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Maimonides Medical Center John Marshall, MD, Assemblymember Joe Lentol, and members of the North Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, among others.

“GoHealth is built from the ground up to take care of exactly the kind of patients who walk in the door in a facility that makes them recognize that by the way it’s built,” noted Korn, applauding the center’s opening in the borough of Brooklyn.

“ERs and urgent cares make natural partners,” added Marshall, who lives, works and raises a family in the borough. “It’s places like this that really bring the care home to people where they are, and that’s important.”

The new facility is open 365 days a year, and is located at 145 Kent Avenue. Its hours are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. every Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, visit www.gohealthuc.com/northwell.

Food Poisoning Symptoms: How to tell if what you're feeling is a stomach bug or something worse

Source: Mic.com

By Melissa Kravitz

February 27, 2017

 

The unforgettable meal you consumed hours ago has suddenly become unforgettable for a whole new reason. Your stomach starts to churn and tighten, you feel like you'll...

Food Poisoning Symptoms: How to tell if what you're feeling is a stomach bug or something worse

Source: Mic.com

By Melissa Kravitz

February 27, 2017

 

The unforgettable meal you consumed hours ago has suddenly become unforgettable for a whole new reason. Your stomach starts to churn and tighten, you feel like you'll never be able to eat anything again and you even start feeling a bit dizzy.

Is that food poisoning? The delicious food you ate could be rebelling against your insides, or you could be sick with something totally unrelated to your last dish. While your assessment alone can't fully decipher the cause for sickness, there are some surefire signs that food is the culprit.

"Symptoms [of food poisoning] can show up as soon as a few hours after eating contaminated food, or as late as a few weeks later," Andy Barnett, medical director at GoHealth Urgent Care, said via email. 

How long does it take for symptoms of food poisoning to set in?

Once the sickness sets in, expect it to last one to two days or up to 10 days, in some cases, Barnett explained. 

 

Any nutritional benefits that may have accompanied the meal is no longer in your stomach. If the food sickness sets in soon after eating, "your body would likely not have the time to absorb the nutrients or calories from the food you had eaten," Barnett said.

Common causes of food poisoning

Eating refrigerated foods that have been left out for an extended period of time can lead to a higher risk of food poisoning, Barnett said, especially with foods like eggs, seafood, raw or undercooked chicken and other dairy products. 

Bacteria that most commonly leads to poisoning include E. coli (most often found in beef and vegetables), salmonella (veggies, fruit, eggs, chicken, pork) campylobacter (dairy and chicken) and listeria (fruit and dairy), the Atlantic reported. 

What to do when food poisoning hits

If you do get food poisoning, symptoms should improve on their own within two days. While you're sick, Barnett recommended improving your symptoms by "abstaining from food and drink for a few hours." When you're hungry again, Barnett said to ease back into eating with easy to digest and blander foods like saltine crackers, bananas and rice. 

"Clear broths and liquids will also assist with staying hydrated," Barnett said. Most importantly, get some rest, because the dehydration and illness will temporarily weaken your body. 

When is food poisoning cause for concern?

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 48 million Americans will become sick from food-borne illness each year, though some of these food sicknesses (E. coli and salmonella, for example) can be much more worrisome than others. 

So how do you know if you have common food poisoning or something more severe? Though the symptoms for food poisoning, the flu and other food-borne illnesses are similar — cramps, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting — there are some warning signs anyone feeling ill after eating should be cautious of. 

 

"If you experience signs of illness such as frequent vomiting in conjunction with trouble keeping liquid down, severe stomach pains, bloody vomit or stools and diarrhea lasting longer than three days, seek care from a doctor," Barnett said. Other red flag symptoms include "a temperature of more than 101.5 Fahrenheit, signs of dehydration including weakness and excessive thirst and neurological difficulties like blurry vision and tingling in the arms," Barnett said. In any of these cases, Barnett suggests seeking medical attention immediately. 

While preventing food poisoning by practicing food safety is always a good idea, there's no surefire way to ensure your food won't poison you. Knowing what's happening to your body, how to take care of yourself and when you'll need additional medical help will help you if you do get sick. 

TRANSACTIONS & NEGOTIATIONS

Source: Ambulatory Advisor

By Richard Romero

February 27, 2017

 

DESIGNING THE ROAD MAP FOR YOUR TRANSACTION

A first time transaction is an important step on the journey of the successful healthcare business owner.  Plann...

TRANSACTIONS & NEGOTIATIONS

Source: Ambulatory Advisor

By Richard Romero

February 27, 2017

 

DESIGNING THE ROAD MAP FOR YOUR TRANSACTION

A first time transaction is an important step on the journey of the successful healthcare business owner.  Planning a road map from the idea of the transaction up until the contract is signed is something that every potential seller needs to think about.  The Ambulatory M&A Advisor brings to its readers some advice on planning the roadmap to the sale.

The First Steps

Todd Laz,  CEO of GoHealth Urgent Care has participated in several healthcare M&A transactions throughout his career.  According to Latz, when taking the first step of planning a transaction, the clear first step is to openly and honestly consider what they, as a potential seller  are seeking to achieve – is it a growth capital raise, a personal liquidity event, a strategic partnership opportunity – and what impact will it have on your current operations.

“Once you have articulated the rationale for the transaction, the next step is to consider the current market: how will it affect what you are seeking to achieve?  Are you ready for this transaction, or are you attempting to be opportunistic given evolving market conditions?  You should also identify the external resources you will need to achieve your goals on an appropriate timeline,” Latz says.

Mark A. Cunningham, shareholder, Chair of the Health Section for Chambliss, Bahner, and Stophel P.C. says as an initial point, he believes it is critical to understand first who the potential buyers out there are, and what the end goals are for the type of business in question.

The owner needs to decide what they want out of a buyer.  Do they want buyer looking at the company from the standpoint of taking over operations on a long-term investment, or instead, one that looks at the business with the goal of reselling it in a three to five year time frame?

“In either case, there will be similar important areas that will be common. How strong are the finances?  What are fundamental risk areas in the seller’s industry and how have they prepared themselves for those risks?  To what extent is the seller staffed appropriately to respond to current market forces?” Cunningham asks.

“However, if one is looking toward a long-term investment, the quality of the existing staff and the historical relationships with that staff may be a more important factor. Furthermore, the extent to which the buyer believes that it can come in and make changes or significantly supplement management are other considerations that need to be explored. Fundamentally, I think the first step is understanding what your potential buyer may want out of the transaction. After you do that, then you can look to common areas within the potential seller’s operations and align those with the buyer’s goals.”

Latz says that preparing to sell a business means that they know when they are prepared to sell it.

“There are certainly stages in the lifecycle of your business when spending a material amount of time considering and preparing for a potential transaction will not make sense.  With that said, I would recommend continually thinking about the future and what type of transaction might best help you achieve your goals, even if that is merely in broad terms.  Having a “road map” will allow you to move more quickly if an opportunity presents itself or if industry and environmental factors create fertile ground for a transaction when you were least expecting it.  Once initiated, transactional processes tend to take on a life of their own and create significant momentum, so you will always be better off if you are prepared,” Latz says.

Best Practices for Preparing a Transaction

Michael J. Reilly, CPA/ABV, CVA, partner in charge of the tax and valuation departments at Dannible and McKee, LLP says financial records are extremely important when planning to sell a healthcare business.   It is important that a business like urgent care has good financial records going into a sale, increasing buyer confidence and decreasing due diligence foot work.

“A lot of times there are year-end adjustment postings, and a lot of times those don’t get made in the records; those get made through an outside accountant and they don’t filter through to the accounting records.  Sometimes the accounting records don’t match up with what the outside accounts do.  For example, you might have internal financial statements and the accountant does tax returns.  The accountant does the tax returns and makes certain adjustments and now the tax returns don’t agree with your internal records.  It is really important to make sure that your financial records tie out with your tax returns so that they are all posted and everything is completed on a timely basis,” Reilly says.

“The other part of financial records is that you want them to be consistent.  Generally, when the buyer is looking at a practice, they are looking at not just the most recent year, but they are going to go back three to five years.  If they see a lot of inconsistencies, it could be due to sloppy accounting and record keeping.  It makes them a little bit nervous.”

Latz says that aside from clean financial records, successful transactions can be done a myriad of ways, but there are a few important constants.

Latz explains that open and transparent communication between buyer and seller is a must.

“There are times when this can be done between respective advisors, and others when this should be done principal to principal.  Also, thorough preparation before embarking on the process: you cannot always be as prepared as you would like to be (for example, when market dynamics require quick action and opportunism), but the more prepared you are before the process starts, the more deal certainty you will achieve,” Latz says.

Latz adds that the highest price is not always the “best” price.

“You need to consider what is most important to you in the transaction: price, continuity or continued involvement/investment, etc.  Be clear in your own mind from the beginning about what you are willing to compromise on and alternatively what is non-negotiable.  If you cannot find common ground with the other side on those key points, you are better served to quickly move on to other alternatives,” he says.

Cunningham explains that understanding the future of the company post-transaction is critical, both as it relates to the internal operations of the company and the external market forces in play.

“First, it becomes imperative to understand the current state of the seller’s internal management and financial structure to see whether or not they, if the market were to stay constant, need any material changes which can be implemented post-closing and whether such changes would be achievable.  Furthermore, having a good understanding of the external market forces is critical. To what extent is the company in a market which is posed to expand or contract?,” Cunningham says, adding that in the healthcare industry there are some past and current issues that owners usually tend to forget, but could be considered important to the buyer.

Cunningham says compliance can be a fundamental issue that, for whatever reason, is viewed as a redheaded stepchild by owners when operating the company, but becomes one of the most toxic issues to a sales process. He says fundamentally, an owner that is wanting to sell its company must have internal personnel that is familiar with the industry there and can competently and assuredly provide answers to a buyer on key compliance issues.

Latz says that when examining errors that can be made, there can be numerous pitfalls in preparing for a strategic transaction, including underestimating the amount of internal effort, resources and time that will be required – transactions can be costly, especially if they are not ultimately consummated.

Latz says another area of concern is misalignment of incentives with strategic advisors (bankers, M&A advisors, legal counsel, etc.), and not taking sufficient time to fully understand the detailed dynamics of your own business.

“You should assume that multiple parties will be taking a hard look at everything you do during the diligence phase and you should understand your own challenges and get in front of them from the beginning, rather than learning about them from third parties,” Latz says.

Top Questions to Ask Prior to the Transaction

Latz says that when considering a transaction, questions need to be asked, not only of the potential buyers but of the advisors beings selected on both the buy and sell sides of the equation.

“Understand your prospective advisors’ experience, both within and beyond your particular industry or service line, and their approach/style,” Latz says adding to make certain that they understand the business’ strategic objectives, resource capacity (how much will the business seek to do internally versus reliance on the advisor) and limits (whether they be financial or other terms).
If you would like to learn more about the concepts covered in this article, want to sell your business or discuss how Ambulatory Alliances, LLC might be able to help you out, contact Blayne Rush, (469)-385-7792, or [email protected].

 

Williamsburg gets Northwell Health-GoHealth urgent care clinic

Source: Williamsburg Patch

By Sarah Kaufman

February 27, 2017

  It's Northwell's first location in Brooklyn. 

WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN — Northwell Health-GoHealth Urgent Care health center opened its first Broo...

Williamsburg gets Northwell Health-GoHealth urgent care clinic

Source: Williamsburg Patch

By Sarah Kaufman

February 27, 2017

 

It's Northwell's first location in Brooklyn. 

WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN — Northwell Health-GoHealth Urgent Care health center opened its first Brooklyn location in Williamsburg on Monday. The health center will be open every day from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. It is in network with most major insurance plans. 

The center is located at 145 Kent Ave. near the Music Hall of Williamsburg. It has x-ray equipment and a lab, as well as an electronic medical record system. 

You can search if your insurance is accepted at all Northwell locations here. Find out more information about Northwell's doctors and providers here.

 

23 Simple Daily Rituals These Executive Do Every Day -- No Matter What

Source: Inc.

By Christina DesMarais

February 25, 2017

 

One thing the highest achievers have in common? A steady dose of discipline.

Study high achievers and you'll find the recipe for success is fairly consistent and i...

23 Simple Daily Rituals These Executive Do Every Day -- No Matter What

Source: Inc.

By Christina DesMarais

February 25, 2017

 

One thing the highest achievers have in common? A steady dose of discipline.

Study high achievers and you'll find the recipe for success is fairly consistent and includes hard work, perseverance, as well as a willingness to take risks and learn from failure. A steady dose of discipline doesn't hurt, either. Take it from these executives, who share their words about the daily habits that helped them get to the top and stay there.

1. Use Alexa and Slack to stay on top of things.

"I typically do parenting duties in the morning, so I have a limited amount of time to get up to speed on anything that is non-parenting. I get my flash briefing from Alexa, which gets me a hands-free summary of what's on fire in the real world, and I do a quick check of Slack on my phone, which gets me a quick summary of what's on fire at work. If someone would come up with a Slack skill for Alexa, my world would be complete--granted I'd need to hand out NDAs to the family."

--Alvaro Hoyos, chief information security officer at OneLogin, which provides single sign-on and identity management for cloud-based applications

2. Hang out upside down.

"I recently purchased an inversion table and spend 15 minutes each morning hanging upside down. I find the practice relaxing and it helps me focus for the day. I also like to cook, so occasionally I enjoy whipping up a nice breakfast like you'd get in a hotel breakfast buffet. My personal favorites are omelets, bacon, hash browns, grilled tomatoes, and French toast. Cooking is very absorbing and active for your brain and keeps you in the present."

--Todd Thibodeaux, president and CEO of the nonprofit IT trade association CompTIA

3. Stay on track with index cards.

"[I keep] to-dos, ideas, and trains of thought on old-school index cards. I find that if I do this every single day before I start my day, then I have a grip on the priorities and areas to push on with my team. I have tried many different apps and programs but nothing replaces the speed, quick updating, and always-with-me benefits of the index card. In recent years, I did finally upgrade with a Levenger leather holder...but the approach is the same and it has never failed me."

--Blake Waltrip, CEO of The a2 Milk Company, which produces dairy milk from cows that naturally produce the easily digestible A2 protein

4. Get the tough tasks out of the way first.

"Do the task you least want to do during your day first. Otherwise, it becomes the task you avoid and the task that will never get done."

--Russ Reynolds, CEO of Batteries Plus Bulbs

5. Say what you mean.

"My communication style is direct, blunt. This was something I came to appreciate while working at Bertelsmann, a German media company. I prefer an open discussion and work best with direct reports who can reciprocate."

--Todd Krizelman, co-founder and CEO of ad sales intelligence tool MediaRadar

6. Keep updated on industry trends.

"Every day I read EODs [End of Day summaries] from each of our 60-plus urgent care centers. In a dynamic, fast growth, bi-coastal, multi-site business, it can be difficult to maintain your connection to the front line, the critical point at which your business either succeeds or fails. The EODs give me a quick, daily barometer of the health of each component of our business, including our culture and whether we are living up to our patient promise to 'put them first.' Every day of the week, even Saturdays and Sundays, since urgent care is a 365-day-a-year business, I look forward to hearing from our caregivers about their day--where we exceeded expectations or saved lives, as well as where we fell short of our goals or saw process or infrastructure breakdowns, so that we can learn from those experiences and deliver even better care the next time."

--Todd Latz, CEO of GoHealth Urgent Care

7. Clear your head after you wake up.

"Every morning, the first thing I do is clear my headspace. Before I even check my email, I spend 10 to 15 minutes in quiet meditation, followed by another 10 to 15 minutes deliberately visualizing the day ahead. Then, I do one simple thing that has become a critical part of my routine: I write down on paper a single thing that I absolutely must get accomplished in the next 24 hours."

--Sunil Thomas, co-founder and CEO of mobile app analytic company CleverTap

8. Invest in your physical strength.

"I train three to four mornings a week with a personal trainer or on my own. I find that this is the best way to start the day, get clarity, and stay mentally alert. I also do not look at my emails on my phone until I've done this. The first few hours of the morning, from 5:30 to 7:30 a.m., are for myself."

--Rupa Ganatra, co-founder of the Millennial 20/20 Summits

9. Shut off devices and wind down.

"Every evening, I switch my iPhone to 'Do Not Disturb' and spend 45 minutes walking down the beach, reflecting on the events of my day and visualizing how I plan to maximize tomorrow. This works best for me when I'm near water and is critical to help recharge my mind and focus. Without it, the stress builds up."

--Rees Gillespie, co-founder and COO of personal safety device and service company Ripple

10. Make your bed.

"Making your bed in the morning allows you to accomplish one task before you leave for work. It may seem like a small thing, but if you do it once, it becomes routine and motivates you to be productive in general. It takes just two minutes and sets a positive tone for the rest of the workday."

--Doug Baldasare, founder and CEO of ChargeItSpot, a provider of secure cell phone charging stations for retail stores

11. Escape into music.

"I...play music for a few hours--guitar and drums. It clears my head and provides space to do some real reflection and thinking without the distractions and noise of the world around me."

--Moti Cohen, founder and CEO of Apester, which allows publishers to embed polls, surveys, and quizzes into online content

12. Take time to reflect.

"It's important that you take time a few times a week to step back and get clarity. I find this benefits effectiveness, productivity, and energy levels. I usually do this by starting the day with a workout, run, listening to music, or grabbing a coffee outside the office. It's very easy to get stuck in the minutiae of a rapidly growing business, and it is imperative to take time to clear the head and think about the bigger picture."

--Toby Mander-Jones, co-founder and chief commercial officer at keyboard company Brydge

13. Work out hard.

"Working out is not only a hobby but a means for maintaining balance in my life. Intense workouts provide me with a stress release that keeps me balanced and focused in every other aspect of life. I love high intensity workouts and work out anywhere and everywhere to make sure I fit it into my day, even if I'm traveling. For example, I lifted weights with the guide in the middle of the bush when I was on a safari in Tanzania. I've done one-legged squats on the top of Kilimanjaro during my honeymoon and even handstand pushups in an alleyway in Taichung, Taiwan. I've taken the workout to a whole new level by instituting a workout-of-the-week challenge for the entire company, which is posted on our intranet. The idea is to create very short, high intensity workouts that can be scaled to various fitness levels across the company. Participation is high, and it's a great way to contribute one of my passions to company culture."

--Martin Rawls-Meehan, CEO of Reverie, a Detroit-based sleep technology company that makes mattresses and adjustable beds

14. Always be recruiting.

"I take a long view on talent--hiring, growing, and nurturing great people. I try to spend a few minutes each day helping folks with their careers--whether or not I am trying to recruit them directly to my company. In the long run, these support helps create a strong and productive network, and very often, whether in my current role or a subsequent one, creates a strong bench of talent as I grow teams."

--Kira Wampler, CEO of Art.com, an online destination for high-quality wall art

15. Reward your employees.

"A very positive activity is to ascertain a set of benchmarks or goals for various performance metrics. I have found that it's best to offer a modest reward on a regular basis for achievement to all employees involved in obtaining the desired result. The reward should be meaningful to the employee to motive him or her to continue achieving successful results. While a reward provides employees with a sense of recognition and self-worth, it's equally important to ensure that the rewards are only given during performance months, and as a result of hard work and success, to continue driving overall company growth."

--Carl Wolf, chairman and CEO of Mama Mancini's

16. Tune into the outside world.

"Every day, I dedicate time to get outside of my own head and help me keep perspective on what's happening in the world. I'll read an article or blog post, listen to a podcast or music album, [or] watch a TED speech. It's always no less than one hour, and when I'm done, I find myself with new ideas and more energy to bring to the business."

--Lance Neuhauser, CEO at 4C Insights, a data science and media technology company

17. Read a crime novel every night.

"To run a business, you have to be deeply involved in all the minutiae, from strategy to product to hiring. To avoid getting bogged down in the details and keep creativity at its highest, I've found a very simple routine that's proved effective: I read a chapter or two of a crime novel before going to sleep. Diving into the story, identifying with the characters, and trying to solve the mystery has two effects on me. First, it is a very efficient way to disconnect from all the problems I face in the business. Getting lost in the details of the story, instead of the details of the business, lets me stay focused on the big picture for the business. Second, it immediately unlocks my creativity. My mind has no limits while I'm reading, and it shouldn't while I'm conducting business."

--Michel Morvan, founder and CEO of The CoSMo Company, a provider of decision management technology

18. Work to find inspiration.

"Pablo Picasso once said, 'Inspiration exists, but it must find us working.' Be inspired, dream big, and put together the steps to accomplish your goal. Then, roll up your sleeves and get to it. Until you take action, all the dreams and planning are just that. We are constantly checking ourselves to make sure that our good ideas are being realized. This principle can be applied to every part of your life and business. If you want it to succeed, put in the effort."

--Philip Pavkov, COO of Solfire Clothing

19. Read voraciously.

"Everything that we need to know about anything is available online. I have five books on a variety of topics and multiple news feeds going on at any given time. I spend about 40 percent of each day reading about various topics, including leadership, teamwork, sports, politics, meditative principles, or health. Jacking into my brain knowledge written by people much smarter than me makes me a better person, executive, and family man."

--Paul Marobella, CEO of global advertising company Havas Chicago

20. Demonstrate gratitude.

"Every day, with persistence, I demonstrate gratitude to someone in our company. In some way, shape, or form, I make sure to express my thanks and appreciation for their work. And not a day goes by that I don't have something to be genuinely grateful for. I imagine most executives could say the same, but if you don't take the time to recognize those things, you risk your team taking them for granted...creating the monster of ingratitude. Demonstrating gratitude makes teams stronger, knits employee hearts to the 'why,' and helps keep leaders humble. While immeasurable in terms of true impact, gratitude is simple, it's free, and fosters an environment where epic results can be achieved."

--Bryan Miles, co-CEO of BELAY, a virtual services company dedicated to growing organizations

21. Start the day early.

"It gives me time to see the day coming. I arrive early to greet everyone. People appreciate it, learn the benefits, and start to adopt it. It's very productive."

--Sharone Ben-Harosh, founder and CEO of moving company FlatRate

22. Praise publicly and give feedback privately.

"I use the Dale Carnegie approach of publicly recognizing performance and praising team members for a job well done. However, I always deliver critical feedback in a private meeting, away from colleagues and peers. This helps reinforce a positive culture, keeping our team motivated and positive."

--Ken Staut, founder and CEO of GrowthFountain, an equity crowdfunding platform

23. Operate with complete transparency with your employees.

"Employees are much more likely to work hard if they understand how their individual efforts affect overall revenue growth, profits, and other measures of success. I go out of my way to make sure everyone understands our big picture business objectives, and how each of their individual contributions is critical to the success of the entire team."

--Phil Shawe, founder and co-CEO of translation and content management company TransPerfect

California health giants are grappling with severe doctor shortage

Source: San Francisco Business Times

By Antoinette Siu

February 24, 2017

 

UCSF says California faces a primary care doctor shortage, and the problem will get worse in the next 10 years. Here's how Bay Area health organiz...

California health giants are grappling with severe doctor shortage

Source: San Francisco Business Times

By Antoinette Siu

February 24, 2017

 

UCSF says California faces a primary care doctor shortage, and the problem will get worse in the next 10 years. Here's how Bay Area health organizations are handling it.

What makes Pedialyte such a good hangover cure?

Source: Mic. com

By Melissa Kravitz

February 18, 2017

 

When you overdo it with adult beverages, it's sometimes a kid's drink that may be able to help the most.  

Pedialyte has long been touted as the perfect hangover ...

What makes Pedialyte such a good hangover cure?

Source: Mic. com

By Melissa Kravitz

February 18, 2017

 

When you overdo it with adult beverages, it's sometimes a kid's drink that may be able to help the most. 

 

Pedialyte has long been touted as the perfect hangover cure. But is there any science explaining what makes this colorful kid's beverage help you feel better the morning after, or is it just the comfort of something sweet and vibrant that can help ease your hungover woes?

While a bartender told Mic that Pedialyte cocktails were a bad idea (taste-wise, not hangover-wise), we went to a medical doctor to weigh in on the health benefits of adults drinking Pedialyte.

Pedialyte helps you rehydrate

 

"Alcohol is a diuretic, causing you to produce more urine and take more trips to the bathroom when drinking," Erick Miranda of GoHealth Urgent Care explained. Since you're rushing to the bar bathroom so often, you're at risk for dehydration.

"Pedialyte contains sodium and potassium, a great combo for fostering rehydration," Miranda said. "Sodium intake triggers your kidneys to retain more water, while potassium is a key nutrient lost during frequent urination, making it important to replenish." So if you need to rehydrate and water just isn't doing it, stirring up a glass of Pedialyte may just begin to help you feel better.

Pedialyte is not a magical cure-all 

"While Pedialyte can drastically assist in rehydration following a night out, it is not a miracle cure for a hangover," Miranda said. "Drinking heavily affects more than your water intake, including your sleep cycle and digestive tract." And sadly, these symptoms will not be improved from solely drinking Pedialyte, which does not help your stomach or replenish lost Z's.

Compared to other electrolyte drinks and popular hangover cures like Gatorade and coconut water, Pedialyte is still a strong contender for your morning-after beverage. A roughly 34-ounce mixed-fruit-flavored bottle of Pedialyte contains more potassium (180 mg) than a 20-ounce bottle of fruit punch Gatorade (75 mg), with fewer than half the calories (25 vs. 130), Miranda pointed out. Gatorade also has 34 grams of sugar, while Pedialyte has none. 

Depending on the brand, coconut water may also have more added sugar than Pedialyte and less sodium and potassium, "making it a less-effective option," Miranda said. 

And what about that Pedialyte cocktail?  

Don't bother choking down the bartender-disapproved concoction. "Because of its rehydrating qualities, Pedialyte works best following a high loss of fluids," Miranda said. "Its ingredients signal the body to replenish lost nutrients and retain water, not to prepare for a forthcoming loss of these fluids." Pregame away, but save the Pedialyte for when you really need it. 

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